Lemon Thyme & Ginger

Braised Baby Artichokes with Anchovy Caper Sauce

Braised Baby Artichokes with Mild Anchovy Sauce, a recipe.

 Recipe for Braised Baby Artichokes bathed in a sauce made from a reduction of the braising liquid, anchovies and capers. 

The birds outside are particularly chirpy today and it just might mean sprinter, spring that feels and acts like winter, is moving out. The light sing-song of robins is so cheerful and upbeat, it is hard to imagine anymore sprinter surprises. As I gaze outside my window, I can see all the animals in my yard scampering about like preschoolers on a play-date. “Olly Olly all come free,” it is safe to come out of hiding.

What does all this wildlife activity have to do with food? It is a reminder and affirmation of good things to come. Something which I appreciate after the long winter hibernation. The first of the local spring vegetables are ramps, spring mushrooms, and asparagus. Yet, these local harvests are not yet available, and I must look westward and south for fresh produce. I am so envious of the produce I see displayed all over Instagram from California farmers markets. California food bloggers and chefs spill their bounty on the kitchen counter and photograph their treasures for all of us to see, making me want to transport myself into their photo. Our day will come, at least the ground is no longer frozen.

Braised Baby Artichokes with Mild Anchovies Sauce, a recipe.

Braised Baby Artichokes with Mild Anchovy Sauce, a recipe.

Recipes with Spring Produce

Stove top Grilled Asparagus, Asparagus with Orange Mayonnaise, Pasta Primavera, Pasta with Ham and Spring Vegetables

California Baby Artichokes

In the meantime, we can enjoy produce, like baby artichokes, from California and pretend we are in full spring bloom. Baby artichokes are spilling over the produce baskets at grocery stores across the country. They are more tender than full size artichokes, but no less flavorful. At this stage the baby artichoke bud has yet to develop the choke, making them slightly easier to prepare and eat. I believe them to be the perfect size and an ideal first course meal or appetizer.

Seeing artichokes always brings me back to my childhood in Northern California, where artichoke plants grew wild in the hills around my neighborhood. I thought they were the strangest looking plants around and I never touched them. To me they were like the dinosaurs of the plant kingdom, with their prickly and ancient looking buds and jagged leaves.

Braised Baby Artichokes with Mild Anchovy Sauce, a recipe.

I’ll never forget the first time I ate an artichoke when I was a young girl. I gladly tried them being ever so eager to appear older and more sophisticated than I was. As I sat staring at my steamed artichoke, I studiously watched and listened to Dad’s instruction as he peeled off each leaf, dip the bottom fleshy part in warm melted butter then scrape off the meat between his teeth. With each step, Dad would explain and demonstrate how to get to the heart of the artichoke, what he referred as the “prize” and purpose for all that work. He spoke so ominously about the choke, saying we would choke if we ate the choke, hence the name. This terrified me, but his safe and loving expression in his fatherly eyes told another story, so I proceeded cautiously but without hesitation.

Braised Baby Artichokes with Mild Anchovy Sauce, a recipe.

Braised Baby Artichokes

Up front there is more prep work when you braise baby artichoke hearts, as opposed to steaming them whole, but the hearts get nicely flavored from the braising liquid and become so tender. Fortunately, because they are small it does not take that much time to trim off all the outer leaves. Braised artichokes are delicious eaten straight from the braising liquid, but I like serving them with a warm sauce made with the braising liquid and anchovies and capers. The anchovies and capers add extra body which compliments the mild artichoke flavor but does not overwhelm it. I purposely kept the anchovies on the light side for that reason.

If you are not a fan of anchovies, reduce the braising liquid as mentioned but omit the anchovies. Taste and adjust the seasoning to your preference then drizzle the sauce over the baby artichokes. This cooking method is also delicious with full-grown artichoke hearts.

Braised Baby Artichokes with Mild Anchovy Sauce, a recipe.

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Braised Baby Artichokes with Mild Anchovy Sauce, a recipe.

Braised Baby Artichokes with Anchovy Caper Sauce

Baby Artichokes are braised in a stock seasoned with lemon, garlic, white wine and herbs. The artichokes are finished with a sauce made with a reduction of the braising liquid, anchovies and capers. There is just enough of the anchovy flavor to compliment the artichokes.  

Delicious first course meal, appetizer or vegetable side dish. 

Course Appetizer, First Course, Vegetable Side Dish
Cuisine Mediterranean
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes
Servings 8 servings
Author Ginger

Ingredients

Braised Artichokes

  • 16 baby artichokes about 1 lb. 9 oz (729 g)
  • bowl full of water
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 TB extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 sage leaves
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 garlic cloves peeled and green germ removed
  • 1/2 tsp fennel seeds
  • 5 black pepper corns
  • 1/2 tsp Kosher salt

Anchovy Caper Sauce

  • Braising Liquid
  • 2 T TB extra virgin olive oil Or butter
  • 4 anchovy fillets
  • 1 tsp capers drained and rinsed
  • 1 TB white wine or vermouth (optional)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • garnish with chopped parsley or chives

Instructions

  1. Peel off three strips of lemon peel with a vegetable peeler.  Set them aside. Thinly slice the garlic cloves and set aside. 

  2. Fill a medium bowl with water and the juice of one lemon. You want just enough water to cover the artichokes. 

  3. Trim the artichokes. Pull off the tough outer leaves by pulling them straight down and off. Continue until all the tough leaves are off until you get to the tender light green leaves. 

    With a sharp paring knife, trim a sliver off the end of each stem and clean around the edge where you pulled off the leaves. You do not want to cut away any of the artichoke meat, just trim the base to clean off any fibrous parts. Trim off about a 1/4 inch off the top of the baby artichoke. 

    Cut the artichoke lengthwise into quarters. As soon as you are finished prepping each artichoke, add the sliced wedges into the bowl filled with lemon water. The lemon water will prevent the artichokes from discoloring. 

  4. In a sauté pan add 2 TB of extra virgin olive oil and heat up over medium heat. Add the slices of garlic, lemon peels, sage, bay leaf, black peppercorns, fennel seeds to the olive oil and sauté for about a minute. Add the artichokes, 2 1/2 cups (625 ml) of the lemon water and Kosher salt, and bring to a boil. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and turn down the heat. Simmer the artichokes until they are tender when pierced with a fork or to taste, about 20 minutes. 

  5. Once the artichokes are tender remove them using a slotted spoon and place in a bowl to keep warm. Taste the braising liquid and add wine or vermouth if needed. Boil the braising liquid and reduce to a 1/2 cup (125 ml). Add the anchovies and break them up in the sauce. Add the capers. Simmer briefly to meld the flavors and taste. Adjust the sauce with more wine or other seasoning if needed.  

  6. Arrange the artichokes on a platter or shallow bowl, drizzled with the anchovy caper sauce. Garnish with chopped parsley and lemon zest. 

    Braised baby artichokes are best eaten warm or at room temperature. The braised artichokes can be chilled, but the sauce should be warm. 

Nutrition Facts
Braised Baby Artichokes with Anchovy Caper Sauce
Amount Per Serving (2 artichokes)
Calories 0
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Braised Baby Artichokes with Anchovy Caper Sauce. Recipe for braised baby artichokes simmered in a liquid seasoned with garlic, herbs and lemon peel. The braised artichokes is drizzled with a mild sauce made with anchovies, capers and concentrated braising liquid. Delicious as an appetizer or first course.

© 2018, Ginger Smith- Lemon Thyme and Ginger. All rights reserved.

2 Comments

  1. Steve

    April 12, 2018 at 9:44 am

    That’s a great recipe cousin, but the work that goes into these artichokes has always scared me away. I wonder if I can butvtge hearts and just make the sauce for them😊. Btw, I love that L, T, and Ginger photo! 😘😘

    Reply
    • Ginger

      April 12, 2018 at 11:06 am

      Thank you Steve. I found with baby artichokes there is not as much work, especially because you do not have to worry about the choke. The braising liquid is part of the sauce, which adds another layer of artichoke flavor in addition to the herbs and spices. The sauce is wonderful. However, your idea is always worth a try. I would suggest heating up the purchased artichoke hearts in the braising liquid, but maybe not add as much water and adjust the amount of lemon juice as you see fit. Then reduce the liquid taste and add the anchovies, capers and other seasonings you like. It is hard to go wrong with garlic, anchovies and capers. Or, you could just heat up olive oil, then add the lemon juice, minced garlic, anchovy fillets and capers and let them meld together on low heat, then drizzle the seasoned olive oil over the artichoke hearts. Let me know how it turns out. I think this sauce would also taste great on blanched asparagus.

      Reply

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